First chapter of Matthew, verses 18-25 may start a different line of thought. Joseph, discovering his betrothed was pregnant, he did not want to publicly disgrace her, let alone have her stoned to death. Why? Because he was a just man, a righteous person: “For the law was not intended for people who do what is right. It is for people who are lawless and rebellious, who are ungodly and sinful, who consider nothing sacred and defile what is holy, who kill their father or mother or commit other murders.” (1 Timothy 1:9, New Living Translation)

Besides , Jesus taught “But I warn you—unless your righteousness is better than the righteousness of the teachers of religious law and the Pharisees, you will never enter the Kingdom of Heaven!” (Matthew 5:20, New Living Translation) Examples are given throughout chapters 5, 6, and 7.

“He answered, ‘Haven’t you read what David did when he and his companions were hungry? He entered the house of God, and he and his companions ate the consecrated bread—which was not lawful for them to do, but only for the priests. Or haven’t you read in the Law that the priests on Sabbath duty in the temple desecrate the Sabbath and yet are innocent? I tell you that something greater than the temple is here. If you had known what these words mean, “I desire mercy, not sacrifice,” you would not have condemned the innocent.” (Matthew 12:3-7, New International Version)

Many make the mistake of taking a sentence or a word out of context to develop a position or an argument against another, a kind of trial judge. The New Testament is full of the self righteous and/or religious leaders trying to portray Jesus as something and someone He was not and is not. Unfortunately, litigants in this trial face prosecutors who take things out of context attempting to slant the evidence in their favor. The jury often listens intently and are swayed easily, because they are not familiar with the whole story, which in this case is some 66 books of the Bible, some 780,000 words. So, the prosecution can pick and choose from a whole bunch of words to make their case.

I’m an honest, genuine, born in the flesh, and born again Christian, and it seems to me that you are not quite there yet.

Just a note for your consideration is that the nations which God destroyed, to those actions of the Hebrews that God commanded, you probably do not know the extent of how evil those nations had become--not just their idolatry, but the sacrifice of children in ceremonial fires, bestiality, rapes and other vile acts. They were not nice people. My opinion is that God was making examples of them for Humanity's benefit. Such people deserve death in regards to eternity. I for one have no desire to live besides such people now or in eternity.

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Born 1950; HS 1968; Born again 1972; Cornell ILR; Steward, Local President/Business Agent; Husband, father, grandfather; winner/loser/everything in between

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D L Henderson

D L Henderson

Born 1950; HS 1968; Born again 1972; Cornell ILR; Steward, Local President/Business Agent; Husband, father, grandfather; winner/loser/everything in between